PDA

View Full Version : Annoying changes in speech



Wixtofa
7th July 2011, 04:57
Scratching an itch. That makes sence.
Itching an itch. That doesn't. But that's what I hear more often.

'You're joking!' and 'You're kidding me!' merging to become 'You're joking me!'

And how 'is' replaces 'are' when it shouldn't:

'Are there any drinks left?' becomes 'Is there any drinks left?' Grr.

I know they're minor but I can't un-hear them.

So, what have you heard?

Heide
7th July 2011, 05:11
My teeth are set on edge when I hear: Me and my friends went, you know, like, to the beach. Just between you and I, we should have went somewhere else. ARRRGGGHHH!

superkat
8th July 2011, 13:25
"I could care less". FYI: to be capable of caring less, you must by definition currently care.

Also: "irregardless". Although, to be fair, that's strictly speaking not really a change in speech, just a change in rampant idiocy.

patman
8th July 2011, 13:52
It drives me to distraction when I hear "talking heads" in the media say "I feel badly" when what is actually meant is "It makes me feel bad, that...". One would never say "I feel sadly" to mean that one is sad. It's an overcorrection - trying desperately to avoid using an adjective where an adverb is required and then ending up using an adverb exactly where an adjective IS required. [Unless the person really did mean that they are doing a poor job of feeling - then "I feel badly" is just the ticket :)]

BTW - Thanks Kat for being the driving force behind "The Lounge". :)

Pat

superkat
8th July 2011, 14:21
It drives me to distraction when I hear "talking heads" in the media say "I feel badly" when what is actually meant is "It makes me feel bad, that...". One would never say "I feel sadly" to mean that one is sad. It's an overcorrection - trying desperately to avoid using an adjective where an adverb is required and then ending up using an adverb exactly where an adjective IS required. [Unless the person really did mean that they are doing a poor job of feeling - then "I feel badly" is just the ticket :)]
Oooooh, yes, that's a good one! I think that may be largely an American thing (which, naturally, doesn't make it any better ;)).

Here's another one that (as far as I know, please God say it hasn't spread elsewhere) is mainly prevalent among the English yoof: answering ANYTHING (completely irregardless (;)) of verb, subject OR ANY VAGUE SEMBLANCE OF SENSE) with "oh, is it?". The uninitiated would probably assume that this would be a) a question, and b) referring to a singular thing, but OH HOW MISTAKEN THEY WOULD BE, because actually "it" is shorthand for ANY NOUN YOU MIGHT WANT TO THINK OF and "is" stands for EVERY FORM OF EVERY VERB IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. For example:

"I had a nice day today."
"Oh, is it?" (Translation into English: "Oh, did you?")

"My brother likes slapping imbeciles with a cold, wet haddock."
"Oh, is it?" (Translation: "Oh, does he [like doing that]?")
"Yes, and you'd better watch out, because I can see him coming round the corner right now and IT'S STARTING TO SMELL FISHY."
"Oh, is it?" (Translation: "Oh, how odd, this sort of thing keeps happening to me and I have no idea why!")


BTW - Thanks Kat for being the driving force behind "The Lounge". :)
Kein Problem :)

Wixtofa
8th July 2011, 18:51
Thank God I've never heard that use of 'Oh, is it?' here.

Wixtofa
10th July 2011, 01:54
This one might just be me, but when people call the outside, grassy, ground the floor. Really thows me sometimes, when someone says 'just put it on the floor, there' and we're outside. I don't know where they're talking about at first.

davidsdottir
16th July 2011, 13:05
I agree with you on that one, Wixtofa, it really irks.

One I keep noticing lately is the use of "may" for "might" - "He may have caught the train is he hadn't been caught in traffic." No-o-o-o... "He might have caught the train if he hadn't been caught in traffic." I always thought that, in this kind of context, if a condition were imposed (and who uses THAT subjunctive any more?) - ... if... - then you use "might".

Wixtofa
23rd July 2011, 06:04
Other ones are:

Should have went. Surely it should be should have gone
Being hung over is lately called just being hung. "Oh God, I'm so hung today..."
Try and, rather than try to. It's as if the 'to' was slurred into sounding like an 'and'. ie. "Try and relax." "Try to relax" makes more sense.

Whiskeyjack
29th August 2011, 14:22
Peeves:

Somebody is on their way somewhere, and I'm on the phone with them, and I know and they know that it's going to take more than twenty minutes for them to arrive at their destination, and they say, "Oh, I'll be there right now." No, you'll be here in twenty+ minutes (or soon)! "Right now" is this instant!

"There is a lot of pieces in the box."
"There are a bag in the cupboard."
When people are writing, and they use "then" where they are supposed to use "than".
"Would of" instead of "would have".

There = Place
Their = Possession
They're = They are

Using "few" when "little" is supposed to be used, or vice versa.

I'm sure there are more. I just can't think of them right now.

:D

Wixtofa
31st August 2011, 04:20
According to Facebook: His annoying = He's annoying.

The three they're / their / there, and the two your / you're all mean the same thing.

Add = ad (advertisement)

And many more.

Heide
31st August 2011, 19:38
Peeves:
Using "few" when "little" is supposed to be used, or vice versa.
I'm sure there are more. I just can't think of them right now.:D
How about 'fewer' and 'less'? Two more words often confused.

Whiskeyjack
1st September 2011, 21:31
How about 'fewer' and 'less'? Two more words often confused.

Yep!

Gitte3
4th September 2011, 04:41
How about 'fewer' and 'less'? Two more words often confused.

OK I give up. I just wrote a nice message (the beginning of it, that is) when everything went topsy turvy and it disappeared into never-never-land.
I do want to get back into the forum, but I'm being discouraged everytime I try. I simply don't get it, no matter how many explanations you and other people have sent me. Maybe I could send my contributions to you by e-mail, and you can then post them wherever you want to, how does that sound? I have lots of things to share , stuff I found while cleaning out my mountains of German materials. BTW can you use some German books? Misc. stuff, or do you know someone who can? No charge, except for the postage, that;s all.

Genug für heute , guck mal, es ist halb sechs morgens! Ich bin total verrückt !
Du fehlst mir sehr!
'Gitte'

Gitte3
4th September 2011, 04:48
Yep!

Hey Whiskeyjack -
where in TX are you? I'm in TX too, but it's a BIG state (as if you didn't know), also, we need some REGEN, do you? If you're at the coast, you've probably had some, huh? Kannst du schon gut Deutsch?
Gruss
'Gitte'

Whiskeyjack
4th September 2011, 07:03
Gitte,

I'm in Donna. It's about ten miles north of the border. We did get some rain and it was very much needed.

Ich spreche ein klein Deutsch, aber nicht wirklich gut. Wo bist du in Texas?

-Deborah

superkat
19th September 2011, 07:45
OK, this isn't really an annoying change in speech, so much as an ANNOYING INABILITY TO SPELL. I see this all the time, most recently about three seconds ago in a message from an actually very intelligent friend who should have known better! The only way I can hold myself back from forcibly making said friend aware of their TERRIBLE LAPSE OF SENSE is by shouting at you lot instead. So! For the record!

YOU DO NOT HAVE LOTS OF "PAST TIMES". A PAST TIME IS A TIME THAT HAS ELAPSED. EVEN IF YOU WERE REALLY SAD, THIS WOULD BY NO STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION COUNT AS A HOBBY. Here is an example sentence: "In past times, PEOPLE COULD ACTUALLY SPELL "PASTIMES"."

Phew, that had to come out! :D

superkat
6th February 2012, 03:43
I will throttle the next person to spell "voila" as "walla" WITH MY OWN BARE HANDS. EH WALLA.

patman
6th February 2012, 18:24
I will throttle the next person to spell "voila" as "walla" WITH MY OWN BARE HANDS. EH WALLA.
Don't forget l'accent grave: wallà (En voilà assez!) ;)

superkat
7th February 2012, 12:11
Don't forget l'accent grave: wallà (En voilà assez!) ;)

Yes, I think it would probably be better with an accent, because that would at least imply that the people using it had some sort of inkling that "walla" isn't actually derived from the Old American for "Oooh, would you look at that!". ;)

(My keyboard nearly explodes under the strain of the ässörted ümläutery I subject it too, though, God knows what would happen if I tried to coax it into actually producing letters with little hats too! :p)

Wixtofa
18th February 2012, 04:14
The akward moment when I notice that my first few posts have ironic typos and mistakes in them, in a thread about annoying spelling and grammar and general 'dumbing-downs'.

Also I spelled awkward wrong.


You looked.

Heide
18th February 2012, 05:05
You looked.
You're right. I did. :D Well, typos occur. That may be careless, but not really dumb.
I'm not sure if this one has been mentioned yet, but how about the confusion between 'your' and 'you're. That's another common one.
Also, "He gave it to myself". That is one I'm hearing more and more often.

Scotty
19th February 2012, 14:09
I don't actually consider the following phrase to be annoying because I use it myself! Quite often!

"I'm fixin' to." Translation: I am going to do that/I am about to do that.
I don't know quite how I came to use this phrase, but it flies in Texas!

One that has always bugged me, escpecially when I was in school, is the phrase "put that up." As a kid in Alaska, teachers would ask me to "put that away." When I moved to Texas, it became "put that up." And the phrase always came with a certain tone that I couldn't handle!

Heide
19th February 2012, 14:32
"I'm fixin' to." Translation: I am going to do that/I am about to do that.
I don't know quite how I came to use this phrase, but it flies in Texas!
and in Florida. I think that's a little more immedieate than "I'm lookin' to". Translation: I'm thinking about doing that.

Another common Florida phrase when one asks if someone would like a ride: Can I carry you?

superkat
20th February 2012, 12:18
The akward moment when I notice that my first few posts have ironic typos and mistakes in them, in a thread about annoying spelling and grammar and general 'dumbing-downs'.
No, it's fine, this is just an impressive example of effortlessly cool postmodern irony, your breezy usage of which causes you to rise infinitely in my esteem. My mental picture of you now looks uncannily like this: :cool:


You looked.
I didn't need to, I'd already noticed it the first time ;)

Wixtofa
17th April 2012, 05:17
Latest one, the confusion between 'passed' and 'past'. ie: Walking passed someone. Arg.