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guenever
27th July 2011, 07:50
Hi!

I am not going to write in German because I am not there yet! Over 15 years ago I took German in high school--3 years. But, we never had to learn any vocabulary, so at a certain point, when we were supposed to be reading and understanding German--I was lost. Our teacher, an Austrian, left it up to us students to learn the vocab on our own without quizzes. Well, as a teacher now--I know that kids aren't going to learn vocab for fun! Then I took a year of German in college. I love the language and this summer I decided to study it. I have three books--German Demystified by Ed Swick and a grammar exercise book by him as well. Also, I have German Made Simple. I am enjoying it. A lot of it is familiar to me--the pronunciation and conjugation--but some of it is confusing. I feel like if I could just ask someone I would get it. So here I am. I am a high school English teacher who enjoys studying German, pixel art, Barbie collecting, television, and Webkinz. And I write way too much! So I am looking forward to being a part of the forum. :)

Heide
27th July 2011, 08:58
Hallo Guenever!

Willkommen im Forum! We're glad that you have found this forum. We have many people here who are anxious to help you further "demystify" this language. I see you've already made use of our "Vocabulary and Grammar" section. :) You may work with a tutor if you'd like. Just post a message in the Beginning Tutoring folder under your name. There you can ask all the questions you want, as well as practice writing. Of course, you can always ask questions elsewhere and take part in any discussions which interest you. There are also exercises you can do for additional practice. If you write in German, you have to add 'kw' (for 'Korrekturen willkommen') at the end of your message. (except in your tutoring thread, where corrections are expected).

By the way, in this forum one can never write TOO much. :D

Wir freuen uns, dass du hier bist. Viel Spa▀ beim Deutschlernen!
Gru▀

guenever
27th July 2011, 15:48
Danke! I am eager to learn as much as I can before I go back to school. I am a high school English teacher and when school begins things get very busy! I will definitely check out the tutoring thread. And I would love to try the exercises. Again, danke for the warm welcome!

Heide
27th July 2011, 17:19
Hallo Guenever,

I'm glad to see that you've opened a thread in the tutoring folder. You should have an answer there before too long. I did want to comment on one portion.
I am going through a book--German DeMystified by Ed Swick. I don't know if that's the best way to become familiar with the language or whether I should make myself do drills or vocab quizzes.
I think that a combination of all methods is the best approach. First of all, going through a grammar book gives you some structure with the studying of a language. There are so many aspects to learning a language that just trying to learn everything at once, or just a piece here and a piece there is not very productive. The difficulty with a book is that you can't ask it questions. Well, you can ask, but it won't answer. So, that's where a tutor can help. As you study, you can get explanations, write your own sentences, etc. and get corrections. Then you can try the exercises which deal with the topic you are working on. (Right now the exercises are all jumbled together and you have to go through the titles to try to find ones you want to work on. Hopefully, I'll be able to get them better organized one of these days.) A word about our tutors. In the beginning tutoring thread, advanced students can act as a tutor. However, their work is monitored by native German speakers to make sure corrections and explanations are indeed correct. When a 'student' reaches a certain level, he/she is encouraged to work then one-on-one with a native speaker in the advanced tutoring thread. The best way to really learn German is to write it and that you can do as often as you want in those tutoring threads.
As for writing the ▀ and umlauts, here (http://www.aboutgerman.net/AGNforums/content.php?123-How-to-Type-Umlauts-in-the-Forum)is a article about that. Meanwhile, just add a 'e' after an umlauted vowel (ń=ae) and ss for ▀. Don't use a capital B. :eek:

Good luck!

guenever
31st July 2011, 09:06
Heide

Thank you for all the advice and encouragement! That's why I sought out the forum--because when I asked my book "why is this so" it didn't say anything! I will try some of the exercises--right now I am stuck with irregular verb conjugation--I am really excited about this forum and the tutoring aspect. This is such a great place! And I am sorry for my faux pas of the B for Eszett. When I write--I write it that way. When I get home on my Mac with internet access I will figure out who the make the Eszett properly. Thanks again! :)

Heide
31st July 2011, 10:39
Hi Guenever,

Don't worry about that B thing. It's a common occurrence. :) I've never used a Mac, but I understand that it's not difficult to write umlauts and the ▀ with one.
Also, don't spend too much on irregular verb conjugation. Just learn the basic concepts and patterns, such as 'i' may become 'ie' or 'a' may become 'ń', etc. It's the same with the past participles. They tend to follow a pattern also. Most of these verbs are ones commonly used, so just by using them, you will learn them. Out of necessity! :D

guenever
31st July 2011, 13:48
Good to know! Thanks! I see the pattern--but memorizing them all seems so tedious.

Heide
31st July 2011, 19:08
Good to know! Thanks! I see the pattern--but memorizing them all seems so tedious.
Most dictionaries, and some textbooks as well, have a complete list of the irregular verbs. Some have just the principle parts of the verb (infinitive, past tense and past participle), but some also include the 3rd person singular form if it is irregular. When I first started learning German, I photocopied the list. It was a quick and convenient way to keep up with those verbs.

guenever
7th August 2011, 15:18
thank you for the suggestion. I actually have a 501 German Verb Book that is pretty comprehensive. So that should work--I will just reference rather than try to memorize and eventually it will come to me I guess. Danke!