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Heide
23rd August 2011, 11:46
Ein 5,9 Erdbeben hat gerade die Ostküste von den USA erschüttert. :eek: Erdbeben sind sehr selten in diesem Teil der USA. Die Erschütterungen waren von Georgia nach Massachusetts spürbar. Das Epizentrum war ungefähr 200 Kilometer von uns entfernt, nicht weit von Washington, D.C.

move.l
23rd August 2011, 12:05
Ein Erdbeben der Stärke 5,9 hat gerade die Ostküste der USA erschüttert. :eek: Erdbeben sind sehr selten in diesem Teil der USA. Die Erschütterungen waren von Georgia bis nach Massachusetts spürbar. Das Epizentrum war ungefähr 200 Kilometer von uns entfernt, nicht weit von Washington, D.C.

Ich hoffe das Ganze ist harmlos ausgegangen?

Mike Lively Jr.
23rd August 2011, 12:06
Yea, my boss said she felt it at her house (small business, we all work from home), clear down here in SC. Oddly, though I only live 5 miles from her, I felt nothing here.

Heide
23rd August 2011, 12:31
Ich hoffe das Ganze ist harmlos ausgegangen?
Bei uns scheint alles in Ordnung zu sein. Aber in Washington wurden die Staatsgebäude evakuiert. Wahrscheinlich hat man sofort am 11. September gedacht und alle hatten Angst vor noch einem Angriff.

superkat
23rd August 2011, 12:36
Krass! Habt ihr die Auswirkungen zu spüren bekommen? Ich hoffe nein, das klingt ja ganz erschreckend!

EDIT: Schwupps, hatte deinen jüngsten Post glatt übersehen! Das freut mich aber, dass bei euch nicht zu viel Unheil angerichtet worden ist :)

Heide
23rd August 2011, 12:41
Yea, my boss said she felt it at her house (small business, we all work from home), clear down here in SC. Oddly, though I only live 5 miles from her, I felt nothing here.
We just felt a little swaying here. My mother, who lives about 5 or 6 miles away said that she first heard a noise (Ach, die Frau ist taub!) and then her computer monitor almost fell off her desk. Ich glaube, sie hat eine lebhafte Vorstellung. :D
I am curious, though, to see if there was any damage in Washington or Virginia.

Heide
23rd August 2011, 12:45
Das freut mich aber, dass bei euch nicht zu viel Unheil angerichtet worden ist :)
Danke, Kat. Mich auch. :)

wingman1985
23rd November 2011, 17:30
Ein 5,9 Erdbeben hat gerade die Ostküste von den USA erschüttert. :eek: Erdbeben sind sehr selten in diesem Teil der USA. Die Erschütterungen waren von Georgia nach Massachusetts spürbar. Das Epizentrum war ungefähr 200 Kilometer von uns entfernt, nicht weit von Washington, D.C.
Hurricane is common in the States, but Earthquake is very rare there. Any casualties there?

Heide
24th November 2011, 04:37
Hurricane is common in the States, but Earthquake is very rare there. Any casualties there?
Actually, earthquakes are quite common on our west coast. Most are very small, and natives of California hardly pay any attention to these small ones. Occasionally, a big one hits which can cause a great deal of damage. Most buildings now in these earthquake-prone zones are built to withstand even a strong earthquake, so the damage is limited. On the east coast, earthquakes are rare, but they do occur occasionally. Most of them are small, but may cause some damage because most buildings are not built to withstand them. The one that hit us this past summer caused a some damage close to the epicenter, but as far as I know, there were no deaths.
Hurricanes hitting the US are not as common as one would think. Most of the time the greatest danger is from flooding. In Florida, the building codes are quite strict and insurance companies have strict requirements to prevent major hurricane damage before they will insure a property.
I think we have more property damage and deaths from tornados than any other natural disaster. They are much more frequent than hurricanes and can totally destoy an entire town within minutes.

wingman1985
27th November 2011, 00:32
Actually, earthquakes are quite common on our west coast. Most are very small, and natives of California hardly pay any attention to these small ones. Occasionally, a big one hits which can cause a great deal of damage. Most buildings now in these earthquake-prone zones are built to withstand even a strong earthquake, so the damage is limited. On the east coast, earthquakes are rare, but they do occur occasionally. Most of them are small, but may cause some damage because most buildings are not built to withstand them. The one that hit us this past summer caused a some damage close to the epicenter, but as far as I know, there were no deaths.
Hurricanes hitting the US are not as common as one would think. Most of the time the greatest danger is from flooding. In Florida, the building codes are quite strict and insurance companies have strict requirements to prevent major hurricane damage before they will insure a property.
I think we have more property damage and deaths from tornados than any other natural disaster. They are much more frequent than hurricanes and can totally destoy an entire town within minutes.
So there is a difference between hurricane and tornado?

JohnPaul44
27th November 2011, 02:05
So there is a difference between hurricane and tornado?
Tornadoes are relatively small, very rapidly rotating columns of air which descend from a cloud during thunderstorms and touch the surface of the earth. They are only a few hundred feet across, last only a few minutes and travel only a few miles, but do great damage, especially if they hit a town. They are most common in North America, but also occur in other parts of the world, including south-central and eastern Asia. They are also called cyclones. Wikipedia has a photo.

Hurricanes are much larger circular storms, hundreds of miles across, that form over the ocean with very strong winds and rain. If they move onto land, they cause wind, rain and flood damage and may last for a day or more. In the western Pacific off the coast of Asia, they are called typhoons.

Hope this helps. I have never seen one.

John

Heide
27th November 2011, 07:19
Hope this helps. I have never seen one.John
Du hast Glück! Here on the east coast we get visited by both. I've seen the results of a few minor tornados, never the tornado itself, thank God, but I've experienced quite a few hurricanes. We've gotten far more hurricanes in the mid-Atlantic states (MD, DE, NJ) than in Florida and I hope never to see another one. :)

JohnPaul44
27th November 2011, 14:26
Du hast Glück! Here on the east coast we get visited by both. I've seen the results of a few minor tornados, never the tornado itself, thank God, but I've experienced quite a few hurricanes. We've gotten far more hurricanes in the mid-Atlantic states (MD, DE, NJ) than in Florida and I hope never to see another one. :)

I have never seen a real earthquake either. Earthquakes are common here in California, but during the 16 years I have lived here, I have only felt a couple of slight shakings. About a year ago, I felt a slight shaking, not enough to move anything, but it scared my cats. They instantly ran and hid under the bed, perhaps the best plan.

John

Heide
27th November 2011, 15:18
I have never seen a real earthquake either. Earthquakes are common here in California, but during the 16 years I have lived here, I have only felt a couple of slight shakings. About a year ago, I felt a slight shaking, not enough to move anything, but it scared my cats. They instantly ran and hid under the bed, perhaps the best plan.John
Where in CA do you live? The eathquake this summer in Virginia was the first one I've really experienced, and that was a very minor one. In 1994 we were in Las Vegas on our way to visit our son in LA, when the Northridge earthquake hit at about 4:30 in the morning. We were on one of the upper floors of the hotel and were awakened by the earthquake. It was just a little shaking, but still over 200 miles away. I think we felt it because we were still on Eastern time and ready to wake up anyway. There was a great deal of damage in LA, whole roads totally gone. The buildings at USC, where my son teaches, were not damaged because they are built on springs of some sort. Even some completely glass buildings remained whole. Everything (including computers) in my son's home was on the floor except for the dishes in the dishwasher. :eek: It took my daughter-in-law a long time to get over the fear.
Animals seem to have an inate sense of impending danger. Too bad we've lost that ability. :(

JohnPaul44
27th November 2011, 17:50
Where in CA do you live? The eathquake this summer in Virginia was the first one I've really experienced, and that was a very minor one. In 1994 we were in Las Vegas on our way to visit our son in LA, when the Northridge earthquake hit at about 4:30 in the morning. We were on one of the upper floors of the hotel and were awakened by the earthquake. It was just a little shaking, but still over 200 miles away. I think we felt it because we were still on Eastern time and ready to wake up anyway. There was a great deal of damage in LA, whole roads totally gone. The buildings at USC, where my son teaches, were not damaged because they are built on springs of some sort. Even some completely glass buildings remained whole. Everything (including computers) in my son's home was on the floor except for the dishes in the dishwasher. :eek: It took my daughter-in-law a long time to get over the fear.
Animals seem to have an inate sense of impending danger. Too bad we've lost that ability. :(
I live in northern California on the coast, only 6 miles from the Oregon border. It has great scenery if you like redwoods and ocean, but is really quite isolated, with no large cities nearby. People here think nothing of driving 100 miles for any major shopping. When I retired 16 years ago from my computer programming job near Seattle, my wife and I stumbled on it. The famous advice for retirees is to spend at least a year in a new place before permanently moving there. We ignored that advice. My wife died 9 years ago, but there is no point to my moving again now. My cats run the house for me. Two belonged to my wife and are quite old now. The other two showed up on my doorstep, one an abandoned kitten and the other needing vet care.

Small earthquakes are often reported here, but usually too weak for me to notice. The "big one" is being predicted. My wife's sister lives in Los Angeles (Burbank, actually) and was there during the Northridge earthquake. She has visited me here several times. At first, I thought of possibly marrying her, but she already has a friend/partner (female) in LA and is happy there. Her friend is western Distribution Manager for Paramount Pictures and makes quite good money. They are both very nice people and I talk to her frequently on the phone.

When the "big" earthquake comes, I will try to get photos of it.

John